Book Recommendation: NYXIA by Scott Reintgen

Nyxia, Scott Reintgen, young adult booksEvery life has a price in this sci-fi thriller that has the nonstop action of The Maze Runner and the high-stakes space setting of Illuminae. This is the first in a new three-book series that will take a group of broken teens to the far reaches of the universe and force them to decide what they’re willing to risk for a lifetime of fortune.

Emmett Atwater isn’t just leaving Detroit; he’s leaving Earth. Why the Babel Corporation recruited him is a mystery, but the number of zeroes on their contract has him boarding their lightship and hoping to return to Earth with enough money to take care of his family.

Forever.

Before long, Emmett discovers that he is one of ten recruits, all of whom have troubled pasts and are a long way from home. Now each recruit must earn the right to travel down to the planet of Eden—a planet that Babel has kept hidden—where they will mine a substance called Nyxia that has quietly become the most valuable material in the universe.

But Babel’s ship is full of secrets. And Emmett will face the ultimate choice: win the fortune at any cost, or find a way to fight that won’t forever compromise what it means to be human.
Excerpt taken from Netgalley.com

Could you turn down an offer of immense wealth and free healthcare for your mother with cancer? What if that offer would send you to the far end of the universe? Emmett and nine other teens are given the opportunity to join a team to mine Nyxia from a far planet. The reader accompanies Emmett as he fights for a spot on the team, faces the bait-and-switch tactics of the company running the mining operation, and strives to find friendship amidst the cut-throat competition he’s been thrown into.

Nyxia is action-packed and fast paced. I enjoyed the creative competitions the teens had to fight their way through for spots on the team and well as the fabulous properties of Nyxia, the valuable substance they’ll be mining. I found myself rooting for Emmett and even sympathizing with some of his less ethical competitors as the grueling contest drew to a close and the stakes got higher. Each character had something to lose if they didn’t make the team. I also found myself wondering exactly what the young miners would find when they reach their Eden, the destination planet. Nyxia is a fun read, great for lovers of sci fi and action-adventure.

I requested an advanced reader copy of Nyxia  in exchange for an unbiased review.

Nyxia will be release on September 12th.
Check out Nyxia on Goodreads.
Pre-order Nyxia from Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Indiebound.

Need more book suggestions? If Nyxia sounds good to you, you might also like these recent young adult science fiction releases:
The Takedown by Corrie Wang
Scythe by Neal Shusterman
Genius: The Game by Leopoldo Gout

Rebecca J Allen, Young adult author
Photo by Pam Vaughan

REBECCA J. ALLEN writes young adult science fiction with heroines much braver than she is and middle grade stories that blend mystery and adventure. She on Twitter at @RebeccaJ_Allen and her website is writerebeccawrite.wordpress.com.

Meet the Winged Pen Pitch Wars Mentors!

Pitch Wars, Winged Pen Pitch Wars MentorsIt’s Pitch Wars time and this year 4 members of The Winged Pen are sharpening their pencils and cracking their knuckles, getting ready to help a lucky mentee revise their ENTIRE MANUSCRIPT so that it shines in the agent round! We know what awesome advice these ladies have provided on our own manuscripts and we want to make sure anyone considering submitting to Pitch Wars chooses them!

The Winged Pen Pitch Wars mentors are:
Julie Artz and Jessica Vitalis – co-mentoring middle grade
Gabrielle Byrne – mentoring middle grade
Marty Mayberry – mentoring adult

Have you ever been on the other side of a writing contest…submitting? If so, what did you learn from the experience?

Julie: I was a hopeful in 2014, but wasn’t selected. Then I entered a new manuscript in 2015

A photo of author Julie Artz
Photo credit: Gail Werner

and was selected by the amazing Juliana Brandt. She managed to cram what I think of as an intensive MFA into two months, teaching me about story structure and writing emotion and so much more.

I’m a big fan of contests (having also been in Pitch Slam and a few others), but the biggest thing I’ve learned is that everyone needs to find their own path. I didn’t get my agent with my Pitch Wars manuscript, but I still think everything I learned during the contests allowed me to write the manuscript that got me my agent.

Jessica: The one and only writing contest I ever entered was…Pitch Wars! I was absolutely sure my manuscript was as polished as I could make it on my own. After 120+ rejections on my two previous manuscripts, I was desperate for a mentor to help take my work to the next level. Unfortunately, I wasn’t selected. *cue wails of despair*

The good news? I got a call from my agent (who had seen my manuscript during WriteOnCon) offering representation the day after the mentees were announced. This whole experience taught me several valuable lessons: don’t rush the process (after I felt the manuscript was “ready,” I set it aside for a few months and then read/edited with fresh eyes before sending it out, which was something I hadn’t done with the two previous manuscripts), there is no one right path in this industry, and most important of all: NEVER GIVE UP!

Gabrielle: I’ve entered several contests, including Pitch Wars. The first time I entered, I didn’t get in. The second time, I squeaked in as the very last alternate. What did I learn? I learned tons about revision, and diving in, and persisting. I also learned that without fail, the writing community would bolster my spirits and push me forward, if I reached out. That book eventually got me represented, in no small part because of those Pitch Wars revisions.

Along the way, I made some really good friends as well as critique partners, and I’ve had the privilege of watching people I know and love rise to the top of their game and get published.

Marty: I was a PitchWars Alternate in ’13, but got no requests. This hit hard, but I ultimately signed with my agent (for that MS) through a Twitter pitch event. So, hang in there. There are many different paths to success.

 

What draws you into a story?

Julie: There is a magic combination of fresh premise (even in a retelling!), compelling voice, and starting the story at the point where stakes and conflict will come together in the right way to make questions pop into my head as I read. Then I know I’m hooked.

Jessica: Voice, voice, voice, and voice. Oh, and did I mention voice? (Also: an intriguing premise accompanied by superb writing.)

Gabrielle: I want to connect with the character. That’s partly about the voice, but it’s also being clear about what’s at stake, and what those stakes mean to the MC. The world building (fantasy or otherwise) is a huge draw for me too. A well written world can be such a vivid experience, and if it’s accompanied by clear stakes, and a unique voice, it’s pure gold.

Marty: There’s probably an echo here, but Voice. Hook me with a character I want to follow for 80,000 words.

In an ideal world, what would be your plan for working with your mentee?Pitch Wars, Pitch Wars Mentors

Julie: I’m very big-picture oriented. So I’ll be deep diving into the character arc and major plot structure in my edit letter, along with looking for themes, motifs, and imagery that can be used not only to up tension in the story, but to reinforce the character’s arc. I’m also a big believer in homework, so my mentee can expect a list of comp titles to check out, as well as craft articles/blog posts and maybe even books to refer to during revision.

My amazing co-mentor, Jessica Vitalis, is way better with the line edits than I am, although I’ll also take a look for repeated issues like wordy dialogue, junk words, emotional telling, and saggy pace/lagging tension in a second pass.

Jessica:  Typically I start with a detailed (and lengthy) edit letter covering big picture elements (plot, structure, character development, etc.), which leads to a week or two of intense brainstorming. After the big stuff is done, I go crazy with my red pen. Along the way, we’ll get to know each other really well and become critique partners and BFFs (you did say in my ideal world, right?). Of course this year I’m co-mentoring with the inimitable Julie Artz, so we’re going to be double trouble the whole process is going to be extra amazing.

Gabrielle: Like with the other pennies, my mentee will get a long edit letter. Depending on what I think the issues with the manuscript are, I’ll share my thoughts about the pacing and character arcs, the world/setting, the dialogue, the secondary plot lines, the character relationships, and the prose. If there’s a big change–to plot or character–that I want to recommend, I’ll probably already have mentioned it to them, but we’ll have a more in-depth conversation about it early in the process.

It’s possible I’ll give my mentee a week or so of “homework”.  This might consist of reading a book or two critically, with particular things in mind, or it might be short writing exercises to strengthen particular skills, or both. After my mentee’s done their edits, I’ll comb through the manuscript a second time and we’ll tighten things up, and smooth things out. Voila!

Marty: I’m co-mentoring adult with Léonie Kelsall year. We’ll offer our mentee what I gave my prior mentees: Complete read-through with edit letter, ongoing discussion about edits & support as needed, plus a second read-through if there’s time, which will include line edits. We’ll also help with the synopsis, query, and first page/pitch for the agent round. We’ll be there for our mentee after PitchWars when they get requests, offers, etc., and then promote their books when they sell. We’re the complete package. LOL.

Lightening round! Fasten your seat belts!
Favorite writing snack?

Julie: Macadamia nuts or roasted almonds. With oodles of tea, of course.

Jessica: I don’t necessarily have an all-time favorite, but right now I’m on a peanut M&M binge.

Gabrielle: Sourdough toast with almond butter, popcorn with Siracha, or cashews with Thai spices, depending on the scene. Coffee. That’s a snack, right?

Marty: Lately: pickles, especially Sweet Chili Thai. And Earl Grey Tea.

Favorite 5 minute break between writing/revising chapters?

Julie: Twitter! Or loving up on my kitties, who typically sit in my lap while I’m working anyway.

Jessica: I often get cold when I write, so I occasionally do jumping jacks or burpees to warm up.

Gabrielle: 5 minutes? Sheesh. Make coffee, I guess. Light a candle maybe? If I need a real break though, I take a long hot shower, or go on a walk. Both really help work through blocks and problems.

Marty: Walk, walk, walk. I aim for >14,000 steps on my pedometer daily.

Favorite writing craft book?

Julie: Story Genius by Lisa Cron changed my writing life.

Jessica: I’m currently obsessed with Story Engineering.

Gabrielle: My newest obsession is The Secrets of Story by Matt Bird, but I’ve long loved Stein on Writing by Sol Stein as well. It’s an oldie, but a goodie.

Marty: Stephen King’s On Writing.

Thanks to Julie, Jessica, Gabby and Marty for being on the blog today! Thanks also to Brenda Drake, queen of Pitch Wars, for hosting the awesome contest and to the whole team that helps her run it!

If you want deep a little deeper on our mentors, you can find last year’s interview of the Winged Pen Pitch War Mentors or click their names below to find their Pitch War bios and wish lists.
Julie Artz
Jessica Vitalis
Gabrielle Byrne
Marty Mayberry

REBECCA J. ALLEN writes young adult science fiction with heroines much braver than she is and middle grade stories that blend mystery and adventure. She on Twitter at @RebeccaJ_Allen and her website is writerebeccawrite.wordpress.com.

 

 

Interview with Kristi Wientge, Author of KARMA KHULLAR’S MUSTACHE, and her agent Patricia Nelson

middle grade books, Karma Kullar's MustacheWe’re psyched for the launch of Winged Pen member, Kristi Wientge’s, middle grade debut. Karma Khullar’s Mustache will hit bookstore shelves on August 15th! We invited Kristi and her agent, Patricia Nelson of the Marsal Lyon Agency, to talk about Karma and how this story became a book.

Patricia, what first drew you to Karma Khullar’s Mustache?

Patricia: I knew when I first started reading that this novel was the whole package. First of all, as a huge Judy Blume fan, I’m always drawn to contemporary middle grade that deals with the uncomfortable realities of growing up, and I had never seen an MG novel about body hair before, so that made me intrigued right from the pitch. Then, on top of having a great concept, Kristi’s writing had a fantastic specificity – every character in the book, from Karma’s best friend to her obnoxious brother, felt perfectly real, like they could just step right off the page. I was struck by what a great job the book does of braiding together issues of family, friendship, culture, and body image to show all the layers of Karma’s world. Plus, perhaps most importantly of all, Karma’s voice stood out—as a narrator, she’s funny and insightful and has a very unique way of looking at the world that’s relatable while also being completely her own. I loved her right from the first chapter!

Kristi, what made you feel comfortable putting the sale of your story in Patricia’s hands?

Kristi Wientge, Karma Khullar's MustacheKristi:  I actually spent the few days between my email with her and the day we had the call set up scouring every blog post for lists of questions I should ask. Can you believe it that straight away Patricia basically ticked right down my list of questions without me even having to ask a single one?! Not only did that win me over, but it was also her complete excitement for Karma. I felt that she really got what I was going for.

Patricia, what are middle grade readers looking for in a story?

Patricia: Voice is a huge part of it! Kids have exceptionally well-tuned BS detectors, so the Patricia Nelson, Karma Kullar's Mustachevoice really needs to feel genuinely and authentically “kid,” not like an adult trying to sound like a kid. Beyond that, pacing is key in this category—the story needs to move along swiftly, with enough exciting plot developments going on to keep a young reader turning the pages.

Kristi, does Karma have a superpower? If so, what is it?

Kristi: Karma is resilient, super hero resilient.

Patricia, what would you say Karma’s superpower is?

Patricia: I’d say Karma’s superpower is how inventive and imaginative she is—she definitely has no shortage of creative mustache-elimination ideas. 🙂

Kristi: I understand you have a surprise for Winged Pen readers today.

Kristi: We have a giveaway! Win a copy of Karma Khullar’s Mustache by commenting below by 5 p.m. EST on July 17th. The name of one lucky winner will be pulled from the Tri-wizard cup!* International entrees welcome!

Thank you for being on the Winged Pen, ladies!

You can find out more about Karma Khullar’s Mustache or pre-order on the following sites:
Goodreads
Amazon
Barnes & Noble
Indiebound

Want to know more about Kristi and Karma? Here’s a link to our first interview of Kristi Wientge.

* This is not an advanced reader copy but the actual publication copy of the book, so it may take a couple weeks to ship, depending on when Kristi receives her copies.

Rebecca J. Allen, young adult writer
Photo by Pam Vaughan

REBECCA J. ALLEN writes young adult science fiction with heroines much braver than she is and middle grade stories that blend mystery and adventure. She’s on Twitter and her website is here.

 

 

MYC Review: Getting Ready to Draft

Today’s Master Your Craft post is a recap. Each Wednesday we’ve discussed one facet of writing a story. Last week, we finished the section on prewriting. If you started the series late or have gotten busy and missed some posts, here’s your chance to catch up! Below is a list of the posts with links to each.

 

Introducing Master Your Craft

The Big Idea

Creativity to the Rescue: Finding BIG Ideas

Build Your Main Character

Developing Supporting Characters

A Reformed Pantser’s Guide to Character Development

Friends Don’t Let Friends Write Bad Books

Finding Your Voice

Research – Make Your Story Believable

Writing Historical Fiction, or, Notes from a Time Traveler

Setting as Character

Welcome to World Building

Two Approaches to Fantasy World Building

Two Approaches to World Building for Science Fiction

Thanks for following Master Your Craft! Tune in next Wednesday as we move onto to Facing the Blank Page.

Photo by Pam Vaughan

REBECCA J. ALLEN writes young adult science fiction with heroines much braver than she is and middle grade stories that blend mystery and adventure. She’s on Twitter and her website is here.

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